Roll The Credits!

Well, I watched two of my Netflix movies this weekend. Reviews to follow, but first a little rant. OK it isn’t really a rant so much as a rambling. You see, I love movies. To the annoyance of some friends and family, I am a credit watcher. I think it is important to stay and watch the credits, especially if you enjoyed the movie. You see the names that pop up first on the credits…well, they are likely heavily compensated for their efforts, but keep watching.

The names that show up later, may not be so compensated yet a great deal of their blood, sweat and tears brought you 1.5-3 hours of enjoyment and emotion invoking cinema. The major compensation for them might just be their name scrolling up on that screen at the end but so few stick around to watch it. I’ll admit, sometimes my body won’t allow a full credit review. (If I continue watching the credits, I’ll be watching from a very damp seat.) Whenever possible, I try and stick around for the credits. I can’t read all of them as they quickly scroll by, but I try to read as much as I can.

You should try it sometime. It is actually a little awesome to see how many people it takes to bring you a tiny 2-hour escape from reality.

You ask how I’m feeling? Well, I’m fading fast…
fading.jpg

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3 Comments

  1. Scott said,

    May 26, 2004 at 2:12 pm

    ๐Ÿ˜ฏ Oh that picture hurts me…

    As for the credits, I agree. People should watch the credits. Besides… you might miss something. ๐Ÿ˜‰

  2. fl0w3r said,

    May 26, 2004 at 9:28 pm

    I love credit presents!:rock:

  3. dan bloom said,

    July 29, 2004 at 6:18 am

    Almost three-fourths of the survey respondents (71 percent) said they
    sometimes or always stay and watch the credits after a movie.

    QUOTE
    A film, however, is something akin to a band with hundreds of band
    members, almost all of whom play a different instrument and contribute
    their own talents and input. There are directors, producers,
    screenwriters, cinematographers, and literally hundreds more, as you
    see if you stay and watch the credits at the end of a film. I’m one of
    those people who like to watch the credits.

    I would love to stay and watch the credits for TT (I did once, with
    FOTR) but I always feel embarrassed at being the only one sitting
    there – you feel like the people operating the machinery (or whatever
    ๐Ÿ˜€ ) in the cinema are watching you!

    What really made me laugh was, the first showing of TTT that I saw.
    The couple next to us who talked and laughed through the whole film –
    they bloody well sat there and watched the credits go up when everyone
    else was leaving! ๐Ÿ˜ก :confused:

    Clearly many people have been touched and moved by this film. If you
    have been moved and wish to show a gesture of gratitude stay and watch
    the credits. Listen to the music and see who it was that moved you.

    In short, this movie is great. It is a real treat for everyone, so
    you’d better hurry up and watch it. And by the way, stay and watch the
    credits at the end of the show. Anyone with a memory better than
    Dory’s will definitely recognize something, or someone!

    I’m a big old dork, but I always stay and watch the credits of movies.
    I’m usually all by myself in the theatre, but it’s just something I
    do!

    Ebert’s Movie Answer Man column documents an increasing problem at the
    movies, which is beginning to lead to violence among theater-goers:

    Q. Is there a term for the inconsiderate filmgoers who rush to leave
    as soon as the credits roll, but then STOP AND BLOCK YOUR VIEW so they
    can stand and gawk at the surprise outtakes? This situation almost
    caused a fight at a recent showing of “Bruce Almighty.” As soon as the
    credits started, 60-70 percent of the crowd immediately jumped out of
    their seats to leave. But the outtakes started playing, and these same
    people, who were in such a hurry, suddenly stopped in their tracks,
    gawked up at the screen and completely blocked the view of those of us
    who had decided to stay. Seated patrons asked the gawkers to please
    sit back down, only to be met by hostile shouts of, “Oh, be quiet. The
    movie’s over. Why don’t YOU stand up?” Were we seated moviegoers
    within in our rights to ask them to sit down or walk out?
    I think this boils down to a class-battle between movie devotees who
    always stay and watch the credits, outtakes or not, and The Great
    Unwashed, who open candy wrappers, talk on cellphones, and start
    putting on their jackets during denoument. Can the two peacefully
    co-exist?

    If you see the movie, stay and watch the credits. Count how many times
    you see Robert Rodriguez in the credits – he does just about
    everything. Everything.

    This movie contains a number of predictable plot twists, and a few
    unpredictable ones. If you see this film, you should stay and watch
    the credits, because a number of plot-twisting scenes were added to
    make sense of the overall product. They helped raise my appreciation
    of the film …

    …………I’m not a movie person, really don’t dig the theater
    experience, just bugs the holy poop out of me the way people behave
    these days … So I wasn’t necessarily planning to see this one anyway
    … But I’ve had two people tell me they thought some of the special
    effects were second rate :notme: I’ll probably eventually watch it
    when it has its small screen debut a couple of years from now.

    But it’s the kind of movie you really should see on a big screen. ๐Ÿ˜€
    Although I’m totally with you on the way audiences behave these days.
    I’ve gotten so used to special screenings…… through my union I
    joined a film society, where all year (every two weeks), we see
    private screenings (only writers and actors). It’s very quiet, no one
    talks, people actually stay and watch the credits,


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